Archiv der Kategorie debian

autopkgtest 4.0: Simplified CLI, deprecating “adt”

Historically, the “adt-run” command line has allowed multiple tests; as a consequence, arguments like --binary or --override-control were position dependent, which confused users a lot (#795274, #785068, #795274, LP #1453509). On the other hand I don’t know anyone or any CI system which actually makes use of the “multiple tests on a single command line” feature.

The command line also was a bit confusing in other ways, like the explicit --built-tree vs. --unbuilt-tree and the magic / vs. // suffixes, or option vs. positional arguments to specify tests.

The other long-standing confusion is the pervasive “adt” acronym, which is still from the very early times when “autopkgtest” was called “autodebtest” (this was changed one month after autodebtest’s inception, in 2006!).

Thus in some recent night/weekend hack sessions I’ve worked on a new command line interface and consistent naming. This is now available in autopkgtest 4.0 in Debian unstable and Ubuntu Yakkety. You can download and use the deb package on Debian jessie and Ubuntu ≥ 14.04 LTS as well. (I will provide official backports after the first bug fix release after this got some field testing.)

New “autopkgtest” command

The adt-run program is now superseded by autopkgtest:

  • It accepts only exactly one tested source package, and gives a proper error if none or more than one (often unintend) is given. Binaries to be tested, --override-control, etc. can now be specified in any order, making the arguments position independent. So you now can do things like:
    autopkgtest *.dsc *.deb [...]

    Before, *.deb only applied to the following test.

  • The explicit --source, --click-source etc. options are gone, the type of tested source/binary packages, including built vs. unbuilt tree, is detected automatically. Tests are now only specified with positional arguments, without the need (or possibility) to explicitly specify their type. The one exception is --installed-click com.example.myapp as possible names are the same as for apt source package names.
    # Old:
    adt-run --unbuilt-tree pkgs/foo-2 [...]
    # or equivalently:
    adt-run pkgs/foo-2// [...]
    # New:
    autopkgtest pkgs/foo-2
    # Old:
    adt-run --git-source [...]
    # New:
    autopkgtest [...]
  • The virtualization server is now separated with a double instead of a tripe dash, as the former is standard Unix syntax.
  • It defaults to the current directory if that is a Debian source package. This makes the command line particularly simple for the common case of wanting to run tests in the package you are just changing:
    autopkgtest -- schroot sid

    Assuming the current directory is an unbuilt Debian package, this will build the package, and run the tests in ./debian/tests against the built binaries.

  • The virtualization server must be specified with its “short” name only, e. g. “ssh” instead of “adt-virt-ssh”. They also don’t get installed into $PATH any more, as it’s hardly useful to call them directly.

README.running-tests got updated to the new CLI, as usual you can also read the HTML online.

The old adt-run CLI is still available with unchanged behaviour, so it is safe to upgrade existing CI systems to that version.

Image build tools

All adt-build* tools got renamed to autopkgtest-build*, and got changed to build images prefixed with “autopkgtest” instead of “adt”. For example, adt-build-lxc ubuntu xenial now produces an autopkgtest-xenial container instead of adt-xenial.

In order to not break existing CI systems, the new autopkgtest package contains symlinks to the old adt-build* commands, and when being called through them, also produce images with the old “adt-” prefix.

Environment variables in tests

Finally there is a set of environment variables that are exported by autopkgtest for using in tests and image customization tools, which now got renamed from ADT_* to AUTOPKGTEST_*:


As these are being used in existing tests and tools, autopkgtest also exports/checks those under their old ADT_* name. So tests can be converted gradually over time (this might take several years).


As usual, if you find a bug or have a suggestion how to improve the CLI, please file a bug in Debian or in Launchpad. The new CLI is recent enough that we still have some liberty to change it.

Happy testing!

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What’s new in autopkgtest: LXD, MaaS, apt pinning, and more

The last two major autopkgtest releases (3.18 from November, and 3.19 fresh from yesterday) bring some new features that are worth spreading.

New LXD virtualization backend

3.19 debuts the new adt-virt-lxd virtualization backend. In case you missed it, LXD is an API/CLI layer on top of LXC which introduces proper image management, seamlessly use images and containers on remote locations, intelligently caching them locally, automatically configure performant storage backends like zfs or btrfs, and just generally feels really clean and much simpler to use than the “classic” LXC.

Setting it up is not complicated at all. Install the lxd package (possibly from the backports PPA if you are on 14.04 LTS), and add your user to the lxd group. Then you can add the standard LXD image server with

  lxc remote add lco

and use the image to run e. g. the libpng test from the archive:

  adt-run libpng --- lxd lco:ubuntu/trusty/i386
  adt-run libpng --- lxd lco:debian/sid/amd64

The adt-virt-lxd.1 manpage explains this in more detail, also how to use this to run tests in a container on a remote host (how cool is that!), and how to build local images with the usual autopkgtest customizations/optimizations using adt-build-lxd.

I have btrfs running on my laptop, and LXD/autopkgtest automatically use that, so the performance really rocks. Kudos to Stéphane, Serge, Tycho, and the other LXD authors!

The motivation for writing this was to make it possible to move our armhf testing into the cloud (which for $REASONS requires remote containers), but I now have a feeling that soon this will completely replace the existing adt-virt-lxc virt backend, as its much nicer to use.

It is covered by the same regression tests as the LXC runner, and from the perspective of package tests that you run in it it should behave very similar to LXC. The one problem I’m aware of is that autopkgtest-reboot-prepare is broken, but hardly anything is using that yet. This is a bit complicated to fix, but I expect it will be in the next few weeks.

MaaS setup script

While most tests are not particularly sensitive about which kind of hardware/platform they run on, low-level software like the Linux kernel, GL libraries, drivers, or Mir very much are. There is a plan for extending our automatic tests to real hardware for these packages, and being able to run autopkgtests on real iron is one important piece of that puzzle.

MaaS (Metal as a Service) provides just that — it manages a set of machines and provides an API for installing, talking to, and releasing them. The new maas autopkgtest ssh setup script (for the adt-virt-ssh backend) brings together autopkgtest and real hardware. Once you have a MaaS setup, get your API key from the web UI, then you can run a test like this:

  adt-run libpng --- ssh -s maas -- \
     --acquire "arch=amd64 tags=touchscreen" -r wily \
     http://my.maas.server/MAAS 123DEADBEEF:APIkey

The required arguments are the MaaS URL and the API key. Without any further options you will get any available machine installed with the default release. But usually you want to select a particular one by architecture and/or tags, and install a particular distro release, which you can do with the -r/--release and --acquire options.

Note that this is not wired into Ubuntu’s production CI environment, but it will be.

Selectively using packages from -proposed

Up until a few weeks ago, autopkgtest runs in the CI environment were always seeing/using the entirety of -proposed. This often led to lockups where an application foo and one of its dependencies libbar got a new version in -proposed at the same time, and on test regressions it was not clear at all whose fault it was. This often led to perfectly good packages being stuck in -proposed for a long time, and a lot of manual investigation about root causes.


These days we are using a more fine-grained approach: A test run is now specific for a “trigger”, that is, the new package in -proposed (e. g. a new version of libbar) that caused the test (e. g. for “foo”) to run. autopkgtest sets up apt pinning so that only the binary packages for the trigger come from -proposed, the rest from -release. This provides much better isolation between the mush of often hundreds of packages that get synced or uploaded every day.

This new behaviour is controlled by an extension of the --apt-pocket option. So you can say

  adt-run --apt-pocket=proposed=src:foo,libbar1,libbar-data ...

and then only the binaries from the foo source, libbar1, and libbar-data will come from -proposed, everything else from -release.

Caveat:Unfortunately apt’s pinning is rather limited. As soon as any of the explicitly listed packages depends on a package or version that is only available in -proposed, apt falls over and refuses the installation instead of taking the required dependencies from -proposed as well. In that case, adt-run falls back to the previous behaviour of using no pinning at all. (This unfortunately got worse with apt 1.1, bug report to be done). But it’s still helpful in many cases that don’t involve library transitions or other package sets that need to land in lockstep.

Unified testbed setup script

There is a number of changes that need to be made to testbeds so that tests can run with maximum performance (like running dpkg through eatmydata, disabling apt translations, or automatically using the host’s apt-cacher-ng), reliable apt sources, and in a minimal environment (to detect missing dependencies and avoid interference from unrelated services — these days the standard cloud images have a lot of unnecessary fat). There is also a choice whether to apply these only once (every day) to an autopkgtest specific base image, or on the fly to the current ephemeral testbed for every test run (via --setup-commands). Over time this led to quite a lot of code duplication between adt-setup-vm, adt-build-lxc, the new adt-build-lxd, cloud-vm-setup, and create-nova-image-new-release.

I now cleaned this up, and there is now just a single setup-commands/setup-testbed script which works for all kinds of testbeds (LXC, LXD, QEMU images, cloud instances) and both for preparing an image with adt-buildvm-ubuntu-cloud, adt-build-lx[cd] or nova, and with preparing just the current ephemeral testbed via --setup-commands.

While this is mostly an internal refactorization, it does impact users who previously used the adt-setup-vm script for e. g. building Debian images with vmdebootstrap. This script is now gone, and the generic setup-testbed entirely replaces it.


Aside from the above, every new version has a handful of bug fixes and minor improvements, see the git log for details. As always, if you are interested in helping out or contributing a new feature, don’t hesitate to contact me or file a bug report.

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autopkgtest 3.14 “now twice as rebooty”

Almost every new autopkgtest release brings some small improvements, but 3.14 got some reboot related changes worth pointing out.

First of all, I simplified and unified the implementation of rebooting across all runners that support it (ssh, lxc, and qemu). If you use a custom setup script for adt-virt-ssh you might have to update it: Previously, the setup script needed to respond to a reboot function to trigger a reboot, wait for the testbed to go down, and come back up. This got split into issuing the actual reboot system command directly by adt-run itself on the testbed, and the “wait for go down and back up” part. The latter now has a sensible default implementation: it simply waits for the ssh port to become unavailable, and then waits for ssh to respond again; most testbeds should be fine with that. You only need to provide the new wait-reboot function in your ssh setup script if you need to do anything else (such as re-enabling ssh after reboot). Please consult the manpage and the updated SKELETON for details.

The ssh runner gained a new --reboot option to indicate that the remote testbed can be rebooted. This will automatically declare the reboot testbed capability and thus you can now run rebooting tests without having to use a setup script. This is very useful for running tests on real iron.

Finally, in testbeds which support rebooting your tests will now find a new /tmp/autopkgtest-reboot-prepare command. Like /tmp/autopkgtest-reboot it takes an arbitrary “marker”, saves the current state, restores it after reboot and re-starts your test with the marker; however, it will not trigger the actual reboot but expects the test to do that. This is useful if you want to test a piece of software which does a reboot as part of its operation, such as a system-image upgrade. Another use case is testing kernel crashes, kexec or another “nonstandard” way of rebooting the testbed. README.package-tests shows an example how this looks like.

3.14 is now available in Debian unstable and Ubuntu wily. As usual, for older releases you can just grab the deb and install it, it works on all supported Debian and Ubuntu releases.

Enjoy, and let me know if you run into troubles or have questions!

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Ramblings from LinuxCon/Plumbers 2014

I’m on my way home from Düsseldorf where I attended the LinuxCon Europe and Linux Plumber conferences. I was quite surprised how huge LinuxCon was, there were about 1.500 people there! Certainly much more than last year in New Orleans.

Containers (in both LXC and docker flavors) are the Big Thing everybody talks about and works with these days; there was hardly a presentation where these weren’t mentioned at all, and (what felt like) half of the presentations were either how to improve these, or how to use these technologies to solve problems. For example, some people/companies really take LXC to the max and try to do everything in them including tasks which in the past you had only considered full VMs for, like untrusted third-party tenants. For example there was an interesting talk how to secure networking for containers, and pretty much everyone uses docker or LXC now to deploy workloads, run CI tests. There are projects like “fleet” which manage systemd jobs across an entire cluster of containers (distributed task scheduler) or like which auto-build packages from each commit of projects.

Another common topic is the trend towards building/shipping complete (r/o) system images, atomic updates and all that goodness. The central thing here was certainly “Stateless systems, factory reset, and golden images” which analyzed the common requirements and proposed how to implement this with various package systems and scenarios. In my opinion this is certainly the way to go, as our current solution on Ubuntu Touch (i. e. Ubuntu’s system-image) is far too limited and static yet, it doesn’t extend to desktops/servers/cloud workloads at all. It’s also a lot of work to implement this properly, so it’s certainly understandable that we took that shortcut for prototyping and the relatively limited Touch phone environment.

On Plumbers my main occupations were mostly the highly interesting LXC track to see what’s coming in the container world, and the systemd hackfest. On the latter I was again mostly listening (after all, I’m still learning most of the internals there..) and was able to work on some cleanups and improvements like getting rid of some of Debian’s patches and properly run the test suite. It was also great to sync up again with David Zeuthen about the future of udisks and some particular proposed new features. Looks like I’m the de-facto maintainer now, so I’ll need to spend some time soon to review/include/clean up some much requested little features and some fixes.

All in all a great week to meet some fellows of the FOSS world a gain, getting to know a lot of new interesting people and projects, and re-learning to drink beer in the evening (I hardly drink any at home :-P).

If you are interested you can also see my raw notes, but beware that there are mostly just scribbling.

Now, off to next week’s Canonical meeting in Washington, DC!

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Running autopkgtests in the cloud

It’s great to see more and more packages in Debian and Ubuntu getting an autopkgtest. We now have some 660, and soon we’ll get another ~ 4000 from Perl and Ruby packages. Both Debian’s and Ubuntu’s autopkgtest runner machines are currently static manually maintained machines which ache under their load. They just don’t scale, and at least Ubuntu’s runners need quite a lot of handholding.

This needs to stop. To quote Tim “The Tool Man” Taylor: We need more power!. This is a perfect scenario to be put into a cloud with ephemeral VMs to run tests in. They scale, there is no privacy problem, and maintenance of the hosts then becomes Somebody Else’s Problem.

I recently brushed up autopkgtest’s ssh runner and the Nova setup script. Previous versions didn’t support “revert” yet, tests that leaked processes caused eternal hangs due to the way ssh works, and image building wasn’t yet supported well. autopkgtest 3.5.5 now gets along with all that and has a dozen other fixes. So let me introduce the Binford 6100 variable horsepower DEP-8 engine python-coated cloud test runner!

While you can run adt-run from your home machine, it’s probably better to do it from an “autopkgtest controller” cloud instance as well. Testing frequently requires copying files and built package trees between testbeds and controller, which can be quite slow from home and causes timeouts. The requirements on the “controller” node are quite low — you either need the autopkgtest 3.5.5 package installed (possibly a backport to Debian Wheezy or Ubuntu 12.04 LTS), or run it from git ($checkout_dir/run-from-checkout), and other than that you only need python-novaclient and the usual $OS_* OpenStack environment variables. This controller can also stay running all the time and easily drive dozens of tests in parallel as all the real testing action is happening in the ephemeral testbed VMs.

The most important preparation step to do for testing in the cloud is quite similar to testing in local VMs with adt-virt-qemu: You need to have suitable VM images. They should be generated every day so that the tests don’t have to spend 15 minutes on dist-upgrading and rebooting, and they should be minimized. They should also be as similar as possible to local VM images that you get with vmdebootstrap or adt-buildvm-ubuntu-cloud, so that test failures can easily be reproduced by developers on their local machines.

To address this, I refactored the entire knowledge how to turn a pristine “default” vmdebootstrap or cloud image into an autopkgtest environment into a single /usr/share/autopkgtest/adt-setup-vm script. adt-buildvm-ubuntu-cloud now uses this, you shold use it with vmdebootstrap --customize (see adt-virt-qemu(1) for details), and it’s also easy to run for building custom cloud images: Essentially, you pick a suitable “pristine” image, nova boot an instance from it, run adt-setup-vm through ssh, then turn this into a new adt specific “daily” image with nova image-create. I wrote a little script to demonstrate and automate this, the only parameter that it gets is the name of the pristine image to base on. This was tested on Canonical’s Bootstack cloud, so it might need some adjustments on other clouds.

Thus something like this should be run daily (pick the base images from nova image-list):

  $ ./ ubuntu-utopic-14.10-beta2-amd64-server-20140923-disk1.img
  $ ./ ubuntu-utopic-14.10-beta2-i386-server-20140923-disk1.img

This will generate adt-utopic-i386 and adt-utopic-amd64.

Now I picked 34 packages that have the “most demanding” tests, in terms of package size (libreoffice), kernel requirements (udisks2, network manager), reboot requirement (systemd), lots of brittle tests (glib2.0, mysql-5.5), or needing Xvfb (shotwell):

  $ cat pkglist

Now I created a shell wrapper around adt-run to work with the parallel tool and to keep the invocation in a single place:

$ cat adt-run-nova
#!/bin/sh -e
adt-run "$1" -U -o "/tmp/adt-$1" --- ssh -s nova -- \
    --flavor m1.small --image adt-utopic-i386 \
    --net-id 415a0839-eb05-4e7a-907c-413c657f4bf5

Please see /usr/share/autopkgtest/ssh-setup/nova for details of the arguments. --image is the image name we built above, --flavor should use a suitable memory/disk size from nova flavor-list and --net-id is an “always need this constant to select a non-default network” option that is specific to Canonical Bootstack.

Finally, let’ run the packages from above with using ten VMs in parallel:

  parallel -j 10 ./adt-run-nova -- $(< pkglist)

After a few iterations of bug fixing there are now only two failures left which are due to flaky tests, the infrastructure now seems to hold up fairly well.

Meanwhile, Vincent Ladeuil is working full steam to integrate this new stuff into the next-gen Ubuntu CI engine, so that we can soon deploy and run all this fully automatically in production.

Happy testing!

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autopkgtest 3.5: Reboot support, Perl/Ruby implicit tests

Last week’s autopkgtest 3.5 release (in Debian sid and Ubuntu Utopic) brings several new features which I’d like to announce.

Tests that reboot

For testing low-level packages like init or the kernel it is sometimes desirable to reboot the testbed in the middle of a test. For example, I added a new boot_and_services systemd autopkgtest which configures grub to boot with systemd as pid 1, reboots, and then checks that the most important services like lightdm, D-BUS, NetworkManager, and cron come up as expected. (This test will be expanded a lot in the future to cover other areas like the journal, logind, etc.)

In a testbed which supports rebooting (currently only QEMU) your test will now find an “autopkgtest-reboot” command which the test calls with an arbitrary “marker” string. autopkgtest will then reboot the testbed, save/restore any files it needs to (like the tests file tree or previously created artifacts), and then re-run the test with ADT_REBOOT_MARK=mymarker.

The new “Reboot during a test” section in README.package-tests explains this in detail with an example.

Implicit test metadata for similar packages

The Debian pkg-perl team recently discussed how to add package tests to the ~ 3.000 Perl packages. For most of these the test metadata looks pretty much the same, so they created a new pkg-perl-autopkgtest package which centralizes the logic. autopkgtest 3.5 now supports an implicit debian/tests/control control file to avoid having to modify several thousand packages with exactly the same file.

An initial run already looked quite promising, 65% of the packages pass their tests. There will be a few iterations to identify common failures and fix those in pkg-perl-autopkgtest and autopkgtestitself now.

There is still some discussion about how implicit test control files go together with the DEP-8 specification, as other runners like sadt do not support them yet. Most probably we’ll declare those packages XS-Testsuite: autopkgtest-pkg-perl instead of the usual autopkgtest.

In the same vein, Debian’s Ruby maintainer (Antonio Terceiro) added implicit test control support for Ruby packages. We haven’t done a mass test run with those yet, but their structure will probably look very similar.

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vim config for Markdown+LaTeX pandoc editing

I have used LaTeX and latex-beamer for pretty much my entire life of document and presentation production, i. e. since about my 9th school grade. I’ve always found the LaTeX syntax a bit clumsy, but with good enough editor shortcuts to insert e. g. \begin{itemize} \item...\end{itemize} with just two keystrokes, it has been good enough for me.

A few months ago a friend of mine pointed out pandoc to me, which is just simply awesome. It can convert between a million document formats, but most importantly take Markdown and spit out LaTeX, or directly PDF (through an intermediate step of building a LaTeX document and calling pdftex). It also has a template for beamer. Documents now look soo much more readable and are easier to write! And you can always directly write LaTeX commands without any fuss, so that you can use markdown for the structure/headings/enumerations/etc., and LaTeX for formulax, XYTex and the other goodies. That’s how it should always should have been! ☺

So last night I finally sat down and created a vim config for it:

"-- pandoc Markdown+LaTeX -------------------------------------------

function s:MDSettings()
    inoremap <buffer> <Leader>n \note[item]{}<Esc>i
    noremap <buffer> <Leader>b :! pandoc -t beamer % -o %<.pdf<CR><CR>
    noremap <buffer> <Leader>l :! pandoc -t latex % -o %<.pdf<CR>
    noremap <buffer> <Leader>v :! evince %<.pdf 2>&1 >/dev/null &<CR><CR>

    " adjust syntax highlighting for LaTeX parts
    "   inline formulas:
    syntax region Statement oneline matchgroup=Delimiter start="\$" end="\$"
    "   environments:
    syntax region Statement matchgroup=Delimiter start="\\begin{.*}" end="\\end{.*}" contains=Statement
    "   commands:
    syntax region Statement matchgroup=Delimiter start="{" end="}" contains=Statement

autocmd BufRead,BufNewFile *.md setfiletype markdown
autocmd FileType markdown :call <SID>MDSettings()

That gives me “good enough” (with some quirks) highlighting without trying to interpret TeX stuff as Markdown, and shortcuts for calling pandoc and evince. Improvements appreciated!

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autopkgtest 3.2: CLI cleanup, shell command tests, click improvements

Yesterday’s autopkgtest 3.2 release brings several changes and improvements that developers should be aware of.

Cleanup of CLI options, and config files

Previous adt-run versions had rather complex, confusing, and rarely (if ever?) used options for filtering binaries and building sources without testing them. All of those (--instantiate, --sources-tests, --sources-no-tests, --built-binaries-filter, --binaries-forbuilds, and --binaries-fortests) now went away. Now there is only -B/--no-built-binaries left, which disables building/using binaries for the subsequent unbuilt tree or dsc arguments (by default they get built and their binaries used for tests), and I added its opposite --built-binaries for completeness (although you most probably never need this).

The --help output now is a lot easier to read, both due to above cleanup, and also because it now shows several paragraphs for each group of related options, and sorts them in descending importance. The manpage got updated accordingly.

Another new feature is that you can now put arbitrary parts of the command line into a file (thanks to porting to Python’s argparse), with one option/argument per line. So you could e. g. create config files for options and runners which you use often:

$ cat adt_sid

$ adt-run libpng @adt_sid

Shell command tests

If your test only contains a shell command or two, or you want to re-use an existing upstream test executable and just need to wrap it with some command like dbus-launch or env, you can use the new Test-Command: field instead of Tests: to specify the shell command directly:

Test-Command: xvfb-run -a src/tests/run
Depends: @, xvfb, [...]

This avoids having to write lots of tiny wrappers in debian/tests/. This was already possible for click manifests, this release now also brings this for deb packages.

Click improvements

It is now very easy to define an autopilot test with extra package dependencies or restrictions, without having to specify the full command, using the new autopilot_module test definition. See /usr/share/doc/autopkgtest/ for details.

If your test fails and you just want to run your test with additional dependencies or changed restrictions, you can now avoid having to rebuild the .click by pointing --override-control (which previously only worked for deb packages) to the locally modified manifest. You can also (ab)use this to e. g. add the autopilot -v option to autopilot_module.

Unpacking of test dependencies was made more efficient by not downloading Python 2 module packages (which cannot be handled in “unpack into temp dir” mode anyway).

Finally, I made the adb setup script more robust and also faster.

As usual, every change in control formats, CLI etc. have been documented in the manpages and the various READMEs. Enjoy!

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deb, click, schroot, LXC, QEMU, phone, cloud: One autopkgtest to Rule Them All!

We currently use completely different methods and tools of building test beds and running tests for Debian vs. Click packages, for normal uploads vs. CI airline landings vs. upstream project merge proposal testing, and keep lots of knowledge about Click package test metadata external and not easily accessible/discoverable.

Today I released autopkgtest 3.0 (and 3.0.1 with a few minor updates) which is a major milestone in unifying how we run package tests both locally and in production CI. The goals of this are:

  • Keep all test metadata, such as test dependencies, commands to run the test etc., in the project/package source itself instead of external. We have had that for a long time for Debian packages with DEP-8 and debian/tests/control, but not yet for Ubuntu’s Click packages.
  • Use the same tools for Debian and Click packages to simplify what developers have to know about and to reduce the amount of test infrastructure code to maintain.
  • Use the exact same testbeds and test runners in production CI than what developers use locally, so that you can reproduce and investigate failures.
  • Re-use the existing autopkgtest capabilities for using various kinds of testbeds, and conversely, making all new testbed types immediately available to all package formats.
  • Stop putting tests into the Ubuntu archive as packages (such as mediaplayer-app-autopilot). This just adds packaging and archive space overhead and also makes updating tests a lot harder and taking longer than it should.

So, let’s dive into the new features!

New runner: adt-virt-ssh

We want to run tests on real hardware such as a laptop of a particular brand with a particular graphics card, or an Ubuntu phone. We also want to restructure our current CI machinery to run tests on a real OpenStack cloud and gradually get rid of our hand-maintained QA lab with its test machines. While these use cases seem rather different, they both have in common that there is an already existing machine which is pretty much only accessible with ssh. Once you have an ssh connection, they look pretty much the same, you just need different initial setup (like fiddling with adb, calling nova boot, etc.) to prepare them.

So the new adt-virt-ssh runner factorizes all the common bits such as communicating with adt-run, auto-detecting sudo availability, doing SSH connection sharing etc., and delegates the target specific bits to a “setup script”. E. g. we could specify --setup-script ssh-setup-nova or --setup-script ssh-setup-adb which would then get called with open at the appropriate time by adt-run; it calls the nova commands to create a VM, or run a few adb commands to install/start ssh and install the public key. Then autopkgtest does its thing, and eventually calls the script with cleanup again. The actual protocol is a bit more involved (see manpage), but that’s the general idea.

autopkgtest now ships readymade scripts for these two use cases. So you could e. g. run the libpng tests in a temporary cloud VM:

# if you don't have one, create it with "nova keypair-create"
$ nova keypair-list
| pitti | 9f:31:cf:78:50:4f:42:04:7a:87:d7:2a:75:5e:46:56 |

# find a suitable image
$ nova image-list 
| ca2e362c-62c9-4c0d-82a6-5d6a37fcb251 | Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS (amd64 20140607.1) - Partner Image                         | ACTIVE |  

$ nova flavor-list 
| 100 | standard.xsmall  | 1024      | 10   | 10        |      | 1     | 1.0         | N/A       |

# now run the tests: please be patient, this takes a few mins!
$ adt-run libpng --setup-commands="apt-get update" --- ssh -s /usr/share/autopkgtest/ssh-setup/nova -- \
   -f standard.xsmall -i ca2e362c-62c9-4c0d-82a6-5d6a37fcb251 -k pitti
adt-run [16:23:16]: test build:  - - - - - - - - - - results - - - - - - - - - -
build                PASS
adt-run: @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ tests done.

Please see man adt-virt-ssh for details how to use it and how to write setup scripts. There is also a commented /usr/share/autopkgtest/ssh-setup/SKELETON template for writing your own for your use cases. You can also not use any setup script and just specify user and host name as options, but please remember that the ssh runner cannot clean up after itself, so never use this on important machines which you can’t reset/reinstall!

Test dependency installation without apt/root

Ubuntu phones with system images have a read-only file system where you can’t install test dependencies with apt. A similar case is using the “null” runner without root. When apt-get install is not available, autopkgtest now has a reduced fallback mode: it downloads the required test dependencies, unpacks them into a temporary directory, and runs the tests with $PATH, $PYTHONPATH, $GI_TYPELIB_PATH, etc. pointing to the unpacked temp dir. Of course this only works for packages which are relocatable in that way, i. e. libraries, Python modules, or command line tools; it will totally fail for things which look for config files, plugins etc. in hardcoded directory paths. But it’s good enough for the purposes of Click package testing such as installing autopilot, libautopilot-qt etc.

Click package support

autopkgtest now recognizes click source directories and *.click package arguments, and introduces a new test metadata specification syntax in a click package manifest. This is similar in spirit and capabilities to DEP-8 debian/tests/control, except that it’s using JSON:

    "x-test": {
        "unit": "tests/unittests",
        "smoke": {
            "path": "tests/smoketest",
            "depends": ["shunit2", "moreutils"],
            "restrictions": ["allow-stderr"]
        "another": {
            "command": "echo hello > /tmp/world.txt"

For convenience, there is also some magic to make running autopilot tests particularly simple. E. g. our existing click packages usually specify something like

    "x-test": {
        "autopilot": "ubuntu_calculator_app"

which is enough to “do what I mean”, i. e. implicitly add the autopilot test depends and run autopilot with the specified test module name. You can specify your own dependencies and/or commands, and restrictions etc., of course.

So with this, and the previous support for non-apt test dependencies and the ssh runner, we can put all this together to run the tests for e. g. the Ubuntu calculator app on the phone:

$ bzr branch lp:ubuntu-calculator-app
# built straight from that branch; TODO: where is the official" download URL?
$ wget
$ adt-run ubuntu-calculator-app/ --- \
      ssh -s /usr/share/autopkgtest/ssh-setup/adb
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/tmp/adt-run.KfY5bG/tree/tests/autopilot/ubuntu_calculator_app/tests/", line 93, in test_divide_with_infinity_length_result_number
  File "/tmp/adt-run.KfY5bG/tree/tests/autopilot/ubuntu_calculator_app/tests/", line 63, in _assert_result
    self.main_view.get_result, Eventually(Equals(expected_result)))
  File "/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/testtools/", line 406, in assertThat
    raise mismatch_error
testtools.matchers._impl.MismatchError: After 10.0 seconds test failed: '0.33333333' != '0.3'

Ran 33 tests in 295.586s
FAILED (failures=1)

Note that the current adb ssh setup script deals with some things like applying the autopilot click AppArmor hooks and disabling screen dimming, but it does not do the first-time setup (connecting to network, doing the gesture intro) and unlocking the screen. These are still on the TODO list, but I need to find out how to do these properly. Help appreciated!

Click app tests in schroot/containers

But, that’s not the only thing you can do! autopkgtest has all these other runners, so why not try and run them in a schroot or container? To emulate the environment of an Ubuntu Touch session I wrote a --setup-commands script:

adt-run --setup-commands /usr/share/autopkgtest/setup-commands/ubuntu-touch-session \
    ubuntu-calculator-app/ --- schroot utopic

This will actually work in the sense of running (and succeeding) the autopilot tests, but it will fail due to a lot of libust[11345/11358]: Error: Error opening shm /lttng-ust-wait... warnings on stderr. I don’t know what these mean, just that I also see them on the phone itself occasionally.

I also wrote another setup-commands script which emulates “read-only apt”, so that you can test the “unpack only” fallback. So you could prepare a container with click and the App framework preinstalled (so that it doesn’t always take ages to install them), starting from a standard adt-build-lxc container:

$ sudo lxc-clone -o adt-utopic -n click
$ sudo lxc-start -n click
  # run "sudo apt-get install click ubuntu-sdk-libs ubuntu-app-launch-tools" there
  # then "sudo powerdown"

# current apparmor profile doesn't allow remounting something read-only
$ echo "lxc.aa_profile = unconfined" | sudo tee -a /var/lib/lxc/click/config

Now that container has enough stuff preinstalled to be reasonably fast to set up, and the remaining test dependencies (mostly autopilot) work fine with the unpack/$*_PATH fallback:

$ adt-run --setup-commands /usr/share/autopkgtest/setup-commands/ubuntu-touch-session \
          --setup-commands /usr/share/autopkgtest/setup-commands/ro-apt \
          ubuntu-calculator-app/ \
          --- lxc -es click

This will successfully run all the tests, and provided you have apt-cacher-ng installed, it only takes a few seconds to set up. This might be a nice thing to do on merge proposals, if you don’t have an actual phone at hand, or don’t want to clutter it up.

autopkgtest 3.0.1 will be available in Utopic tomorrow (through autosyncs). If you can’t wait to try it out, download it from my people.c.c page ☺.

Feedback appreciated!

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Booting Ubuntu with systemd: Now in Utopic

Hot on the heels of my previous annoucement of my systemd PPA for trusty, I’m now happy to announce that the latest systemd 204-10ubuntu1 just landed in Utopic, after sorting out enough of the current uninstallability in -proposed. The other fixes (bluez, resolvconf, lightdm, etc.) already landed a few days ago. Compared to the PPA these have a lot of other fixes and cleanups, due to the excellent hackfest that we held last weekend.

So, upgrade today and let us know about problems in bugs tagged “systemd-boot”.

I think systemd in current utopic works well enough to not break a developer’s day to day workflow, so we can now start parallelizing the work of identifying packages which only have upstart jobs and provide corresponding systemd units (or SysV script). Also, this hasn’t yet been tested on the phone at all, I’m sure that it’ll require quite some work (e. g. lxc-android-config has a lot of upstart jobs). To clarify, there is nofixed date/plan/deadline when this will be done, in particular it might well last more than one release cycle. So we’ll “release” (i. e. switch to it as a default) when it’s ready 🙂

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